AudioBook Review: The Vile Village by Lemony Snicket

VileVillageThe Vile Village by Lemony Snicket

Published by Plume on March 27, 2012

Genres: Childrens, Middle Grade, Fiction, Mystery, Adventure

Pages: NA Format: Audio CD Source: Library

3/5 Stars

Image and Description Credit: Goodreads

Dear Reader,

You have undoubtedly picked up this book by mistake, so please put it down. Nobody in their right mind would read this particular book about the lives of Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire on purpose, because each dismal moment of their stay in the village of V.F.D. has been faithfully and dreadfully recorded in these pages. I can think of no single reason why anyone would want to open a book containing such unpleasant matters as migrating crows, an angry mob, a newspaper headline, the arrest of innocent people, the Deluxe Cell, and some very strange hats. It is my solemn and sacred occupation to research each detail of the Baudelaire children’s lives and write them all down, but you may prefer to do some other solemn and sacred thing, such as reading another book instead.

With all due respect,

Lemony Snicket

In my quest to finish A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket this year I am back listening to them on audiobook. I picked up where I left off last summer, and like all the books before it, The Vile Village had plenty of mishaps, bad fortunes, and dastardly schemes. Here are some of my thoughts on this next set of sorry circumstances for the Baudelaire orphans:

What I Liked

  • I’ve always enjoyed the Baudelaire children: Violet with her inventing, Klaus with his books, and Sunny with her teeth.
  • One of my favorite parts is the translation of Sunny’s random words. Especially now that her speech has slightly progressed.
  • The added mystery of VFD brings depth to the story, hopefully providing answers in books to come.
  • Super informative for children: plot devices, grammar, word meanings, etc.
  • Tim Curry’s narration is a thing of beauty, keeping me focused when my mind tends to wander while driving.

What Irked Me

  • I feel like these books do not have the same appeal for an older audience. I wish I had read them when I was young.
  • The absolute ridiculousness of adults is aggravating though it does reflect an utter disregard for children.
  • The repetitive nature of these stories just gets under my skin and made it hard for me to continue this series to begin with.

Overall, The Vile Village by Lemony Snicket was another solid installment in A Series of Unfortunate Events. If I had read these as a child I probably would have adored them, but there is just a disconnect for adults. I feel like every kid should read these books though. The mystery at the heart of this story is still alive, so I will persevere on to the next one.

Favorite Quotes

  1. For Beatrice-
    When we were together I felt breathless.
    Now you are.
  2. In this large and fierce world of ours, there are many, many unpleasant places to be. You can be in a river swarming with angry electric eels, or in a supermarket filled with vicious long-distance runners. You can be in a hotel that has no room service, or you can be lost in a forest that is slowly filling up with water. You can be in a hornet’s nest or in an abandoned airport or in the office of a pediatric surgeon, but one of the most unpleasant things that can happen is to find yourself in a quandary.
  3. It is true, of course, that there is no way of knowing for sure whether or not you can trust someone, for the simple reason that circumstances change all of the time. You might know someone for several years, for instance, and trust him completely as your friend, but circumstances could change and he could become very hungry, and before you knew it you could be boiling in a soup pot, because there is no way of knowing for sure.

So, have you read The Vile Village by Lemony Snicket? Did your age have bearing on how you felt about the story? Let me know in the comments below!

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