Teaser Tuesday: Beloved

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Hosted by A Daily Rhythm, Teaser Tuesday is a bookish meme meant to highlight passages from books you are currently reading.

Here are the rules (as described by A Daily Rhythm):

  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Today’s teasers come from Toni Morrison’s Beloved a powerful story of slavery and it’s lasting impacts on the mind, body, and soul. This was a book club pick and I’ve found it absolutely riveting so far. Check out the teasers below!

Winter in Ohio was especially rough if you had an appetite for color. Sky provided the only drama, and counting on a Cincinnati horizon for life’s principal joy was reckless indeed. 

~

Baby Suggs died shortly after the brothers left, with no interest whatsoever in their leave-taking or hers, and right afterward Sethe and Denver decided to end the persecution by calling forth the ghost that tried them so.

Have you read Beloved or any of Toni Morrison’s work?

Let me know in the comments below!

Mini Review: Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie

MurderontheOrientExpressMurder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie

Published by HarperCollins Publishers on June 4, 2007

Genres: Adult, Fiction, Mystery, Classics

Pages: 274 Format: Paperback Source: Library

4/5 Stars

Image and Description Credit: Goodreads

What more can a mystery addict desire than a much-loathed murder victim found aboard the luxurious Orient Express with multiple stab wounds, thirteen likely suspects, an incomparably brilliant detective in Hercule Poirot, and the most ingenious crime ever conceived?


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Top 5 Wednesday: Classics I Wish Had Modern Adaptations

Top 5 Wednesday image

Top 5 Wednesday was created by Lainey (Gingerreadslainey on Youtube) as a way for book reviewers and lovers to share their love of lists every Wednesday. Check out the Goodreads group.

  1. Sense & Sensibility
  2. Anna Karenina
  3. Far From the Madding Crowd
  4. Les Misérable
  5. The Hobbit/Lord of the Rings

Inspired by The Lizzie Bennett Diaries, this week’s Top 5 is all about Classics I Wish Had Modern Adaptations. Let’s start with another Jane Austen I absolutely love which is Sense & Sensibility. After reading Tash Hearts Tolstoy I’d love to see Anna Karenina by modernized and I also think Far From the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy would make a good show. Les Mis would also be interesting as an adaptation and my Middle Earth loving heart would totally watch a modern retelling of Tolkien’s work.

Which classics would you like to see modernized?

Let me know in the comments below!

Teaser Tuesday: The Wreath

tuesteas

Hosted by A Daily Rhythm, Teaser Tuesday is a bookish meme meant to highlight passages from books you are currently reading.

Here are the rules (as described by A Daily Rhythm):

  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

This week’s teasers come from this month’s book club selection Kristin Lavransdatter: The Wreath by Sigrid Undset. It’s set in fourteenth century Norway and was originally published in Norwegian in 1920. So far I’m liking it so check out these snippets!

On the other side of the river a bridle path led straight up into the heights, so the men got down from their horses and walked, but Lavrans lifted Kristin forward into his saddle so she could hold on to the saddlebow, and then she was allowed to ride Guldsvein alone.

And another:

“And look how you ride Guldsvein, sitting as straight as a king’s courtier…”

Sound intriguing? Have you read The Wreath?

Let me know in the comments below!

Teaser Tuesday: Far from the Madding Crowd

tuesteas

Hosted by A Daily Rhythm, Teaser Tuesday is a bookish meme meant to highlight passages from books you are currently reading.

Here are the rules (as described by A Daily Rhythm):

  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

My teaser this week comes from Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy. Yet another classic I’ve picked up for book club. So far I think it’s alright and I’ve made good progress. Check this out:

“Well — that is a tale!” said Oak, with dismay. “To run after anybody like this — and then say you don’t want me!”

And this:

“But there was no harm in hurrying to correct a piece of false news that had been told to you.”

Has this peaked your interest? Like reading classics?

Let me know in the comments below!

Teaser Tuesday: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

tuesteas

Hosted by A Daily Rhythm, Teaser Tuesday is a bookish meme meant to highlight passages from books you are currently reading.

Here are the rules (as described by A Daily Rhythm):

  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

This week’s teaser is coming from my book club pick of the month, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce. Now I’ve never read any of Joyce’s works before and I’m honestly not sure how I feel about it yet. Stream of consciousness is kind of hard to get into. Check out this teaser for a little insight:

He was caught in the whirl of a scrimmage and, fearful of the flashing eyes and muddy boots, bent down to look through the legs.

Have you read any James Joyce? Like stream of consciousness in writing?

Let me know in the comments below!

Top 5 Wednesday: Future Classics

Top 5 Wednesday image

Top 5 Wednesday was created by Lainey (Gingerreadslainey on Youtube) as a way for book reviewers and lovers to share their love of lists every Wednesday. Check out the Goodreads group.

  1. The Book Thief
  2. The Hate U Give
  3. Station Eleven
  4. All the Light We Cannot See
  5. The Fault in Our Stars

 This week’s Top 5 is all about current books that I think will one day be considered classics. It’s pretty hard to predict the future but some stories just stand out for the ages. The Book Thief is iconic for it’s narrator and it’s historical tale. While I have yet to read The Hate U Give, it’s already become a landmark book for this generation. Station Eleven is  a perfect mix of genres; both literary fiction and dystopia. All the Light We Cannot See is one of the most talked about historical fictions and The Fault in Our Stars is an emotional yet honest look at illness.

So what five books do YOU think will be future classics? Do you agree with any of my picks? Let me know your thoughts in the comments below!

Classic of the Month: The Master and Margarita

mastermargaritaThe Master and Margaria by Mikhail Bulgakov

Published by Penguin Classics on May 3, 2016

Genres: Adult, Fiction, Classics, Magical Realism, Cultural

Pages: 448 Format: Paperback Source: Library

2.5/5 Stars

Image and Description Credit: Goodreads

A 50th-anniversary Deluxe Edition of the incomparable 20th-century masterpiece of satire and fantasy, in a newly revised version of the acclaimed Pevear and Volokhonsky translation, made from the complete and unabridged Russian text.

Nothing in the whole of literature compares with The Master and Margarita. One spring afternoon, the Devil, trailing fire and chaos in his wake, weaves himself out of the shadows and into Moscow. Mikhail Bulgakov’s fantastical, funny, and devastating satire of Soviet life combines two distinct yet interwoven parts, one set in contemporary Moscow, the other in ancient Jerusalem, each brimming with historical, imaginary, frightful, and wonderful characters. Written during the darkest days of Stalin’s reign, and finally published in 1966 and 1967, The Master and Margarita became a literary phenomenon, signaling artistic and spiritual freedom for Russians everywhere.


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Classic of the Month: A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

christmascarolotherA Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings by Charles Dickens

Published by Penguin Classics on October 30, 2oo3

Genres: Classics, Fiction, Holiday, Literary

Pages: 288 Format: Paperback Source: Library

4/5 Stars

Image and Description Credit: Goodreads

Dickens’ story of solitary miser Ebenezer Scrooge, who is taught the true meaning of Christmas by a series of ghostly visitors, has proved one of his most well-loved works. Ever since it was published in 1843 it has had an enduring influence on the way we think about the traditions of Christmas. Dickens’ other Christmas writings collected here include ‘The Story of the Goblins who Stole a Sexton’, the short story from The Pickwick Papers on which A Christmas Carol was based; The Haunted Man, a tale of a man tormented by painful memories; along with shorter pieces, some drawn from the ‘Christmas Stories’ that Dickens wrote annually for his weekly journals. In all of them Dickens celebrates the season as one of geniality, charity and remembrance.

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Which Classic Female Author Am I?

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Hello all! I’m trying something new today. Instead of a book tag I’m going to take a Buzzfeed quiz. This one is “Which Classic Female Author Are You?” Let’s take a look at how my answers pan out, shall we…

What are you writing with?

Ink Pens

Typewriter

Laptop

Pencils

Quill Pens

Gel Pens

I find it much easier to write pen to paper and don’t mind crossing things out if needed. Continue reading