Teaser Tuesday: Amsterdam

tuesteas

Hosted by A Daily Rhythm, Teaser Tuesday is a bookish meme meant to highlight passages from books you are currently reading.

Here are the rules (as described by A Daily Rhythm):

  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Today’s teasers come from this month’s book club selection, Amsterdam by Ian McEwan. While I struggled with his book Atonement to the point where I DNFed it, this one has been a surprisingly easy read so far. Check out a couple snippets below!

Together they cleared books and papers off the armchairs, then sat with their champagne and small talk.

~

“I’ve been thinking about Molly,” he said at last. “The way she died, the speed of it, her helplessness, how she wouldn’t have wanted it that way. Stuff we’ve talked about before.”

Have you read Amsterdam? Interested in this one?

Let me know in the comments below!

Teaser Tuesday: Pachinko

tuesteas

Hosted by A Daily Rhythm, Teaser Tuesday is a bookish meme meant to highlight passages from books you are currently reading.

Here are the rules (as described by A Daily Rhythm):

  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

This week’s teaser comes from this month’s book club pick, Pachinko by Min Jin Lee. I’m not too far in but I’m hoping to enjoy this titles. Check out the teasers below!

“Oh, I see,” he said, seeing the red stains on the pillow.

~

He couldn’t remember where he was. In his dream, he had been home, resting near the apple orchard; the trees were a riot of white blooms. 

Have you read Pachinko? Interested in the book now?

Let me know in the comments below!

Teaser Tuesday: The Buried Giant

tuesteas

Hosted by A Daily Rhythm, Teaser Tuesday is a bookish meme meant to highlight passages from books you are currently reading.

Here are the rules (as described by A Daily Rhythm):

  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Today’s teaser comes from this month’s book club pick The Buried Giant by Kazuo Ishiguro. Having just started I’m not quite sure what I’ve gotten myself into but here’s hoping I enjoy it. Check out the teasers below!

You would have searched a long time for the sort of winding lane or tranquil meadow for which England later became celebrated.

~

People then who would have regarded them as everyday hazards, and in those days there was so much else to worry about.

Have you read The Buried Giant? Have the teasers piqued your interest?

Let me know in the comments below!

Book Review: Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

LittleFiresEverywhereLittle Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

Published by Penguin Press on September 12, 2017

Genres: Adult, Fiction, Contemporary, Literary

Pages: 338 Format: Hardcover Source: Library

5/5 Stars

Image and Description Credit: Goodreads

In Shaker Heights, a placid, progressive suburb of Cleveland, everything is planned — from the layout of the winding roads, to the colors of the houses, to the successful lives its residents will go on to lead. And no one embodies this spirit more than Elena Richardson, whose guiding principle is playing by the rules. 

Enter Mia Warren — an enigmatic artist and single mother — who arrives in this idyllic bubble with her teenaged daughter Pearl, and rents a house from the Richardsons. Soon Mia and Pearl become more than tenants: all four Richardson children are drawn to the mother-daughter pair. But Mia carries with her a mysterious past and a disregard for the status quo that threatens to upend this carefully ordered community. 

When old family friends of the Richardsons attempt to adopt a Chinese-American baby, a custody battle erupts that dramatically divides the town–and puts Mia and Elena on opposing sides. Suspicious of Mia and her motives, Elena is determined to uncover the secrets in Mia’s past. But her obsession will come at unexpected and devastating costs.


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Teaser Tuesday: Little Fires Everywhere

tuesteas

Hosted by A Daily Rhythm, Teaser Tuesday is a bookish meme meant to highlight passages from books you are currently reading.

Here are the rules (as described by A Daily Rhythm):

  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Today I’ve got a couple teasers from Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng. I’ve read her previous book Everything I Never Told You and absolutely loved it so I have high hopes for this one. Maybe these teasers will intrigue you enough to check out her writing.

Everyone in Shaker Heights was talking about it that summer: how Isabelle, the last of the Richardson children, had finally gone around the bend and burned down the house.

And here’s another:

By then, of course,  Izzy would be long gone, leaving no one to defend her, and people could — and did — say whatever they liked.

Did these quotes pique your interest?

Let me know in the comments below! Continue reading

Teaser Tuesday: The Bird’s Nest

tuesteas

Hosted by A Daily Rhythm, Teaser Tuesday is a bookish meme meant to highlight passages from books you are currently reading.

Here are the rules (as described by A Daily Rhythm):

  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

This week’s teaser comes from Shirley Jackson’s The Bird’s Nest. Its my first book by her and I’m not quite sure what to make of it yet. Check out these quotes to see for yourself:

My own practice has dwindled because of most of my patients are dead…

And another:

I make no excuses or apologies for my medical views, although perhaps my literary style will leave something to be desired…

Have you read any of Shirley Jackson’s books? Interested in The Bird’s Nest?

Let me know in the comments below!

Teaser Tuesday: Angle of Repose

tuesteas

Hosted by A Daily Rhythm, Teaser Tuesday is a bookish meme meant to highlight passages from books you are currently reading.

Here are the rules (as described by A Daily Rhythm):

  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Yet another book club Teaser Tuesday coming at you today. This month we’re reading Angle of Repose by Wallace Stegner, a Pulitzer Prize winner in Fiction from 1972. It’s an interesting look at frontier living and I thought I’d share a couple small passages.

Snow blew down the Royal Gorge in a horizontal blur. With Ollie’s sleeping head in her lap and a down comforter around them both, she tried now and then to get a look at that celebrated scenic wonder, but the gorge was only snow-streaked rock indistinguishable from any other rock, all its height and grandeur and pictorial organization obliterated in storm.

And another:

As if taking an oath, she assured herself that from now on she would have him, and so would Ollie. They would not imagine him any more.

So have you heard of Angle of Repose? Interested in frontier living?

Let me know in the comments below!

Teaser Tuesday: Moonglow

tuesteas

Hosted by A Daily Rhythm, Teaser Tuesday is a bookish meme meant to highlight passages from books you are currently reading.

Here are the rules (as described by A Daily Rhythm):

  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

This month’s book club pick is Moonglow by Michael Chabon. I have a habit of putting these books off to the last minute but I should be able to knock this one out in a week. I’m not entirely certain what this book is about since the description makes it sound like a little of everything but I’m diving in either way. Check out this teaser from a random page:

If I hesitated before assenting to a story, my grandmother would rescind the offer, and weeks might pass before she offered again. So most of the time I simply nodded, unable to resolve the question of whether the company of the teller was worth the toll in bad dreams.

Sounds interesting, right? Has anyone read Moonglow? Let me know in the comments below!

Classic of the Month: The Master and Margarita

mastermargaritaThe Master and Margaria by Mikhail Bulgakov

Published by Penguin Classics on May 3, 2016

Genres: Adult, Fiction, Classics, Magical Realism, Cultural

Pages: 448 Format: Paperback Source: Library

2.5/5 Stars

Image and Description Credit: Goodreads

A 50th-anniversary Deluxe Edition of the incomparable 20th-century masterpiece of satire and fantasy, in a newly revised version of the acclaimed Pevear and Volokhonsky translation, made from the complete and unabridged Russian text.

Nothing in the whole of literature compares with The Master and Margarita. One spring afternoon, the Devil, trailing fire and chaos in his wake, weaves himself out of the shadows and into Moscow. Mikhail Bulgakov’s fantastical, funny, and devastating satire of Soviet life combines two distinct yet interwoven parts, one set in contemporary Moscow, the other in ancient Jerusalem, each brimming with historical, imaginary, frightful, and wonderful characters. Written during the darkest days of Stalin’s reign, and finally published in 1966 and 1967, The Master and Margarita became a literary phenomenon, signaling artistic and spiritual freedom for Russians everywhere.


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Classic of the Month: A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

christmascarolotherA Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings by Charles Dickens

Published by Penguin Classics on October 30, 2oo3

Genres: Classics, Fiction, Holiday, Literary

Pages: 288 Format: Paperback Source: Library

4/5 Stars

Image and Description Credit: Goodreads

Dickens’ story of solitary miser Ebenezer Scrooge, who is taught the true meaning of Christmas by a series of ghostly visitors, has proved one of his most well-loved works. Ever since it was published in 1843 it has had an enduring influence on the way we think about the traditions of Christmas. Dickens’ other Christmas writings collected here include ‘The Story of the Goblins who Stole a Sexton’, the short story from The Pickwick Papers on which A Christmas Carol was based; The Haunted Man, a tale of a man tormented by painful memories; along with shorter pieces, some drawn from the ‘Christmas Stories’ that Dickens wrote annually for his weekly journals. In all of them Dickens celebrates the season as one of geniality, charity and remembrance.

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